Aida

By Vivian Grant

Hello and welcome.

I love Verdi’s Operas. One of my all-time favourites is ‘Aida’.

I created a scenario in my head that Hattingdon had been given a part in the chorus of ‘Aida’, and therefore would need a costume. Being a hatmaker (a cartoon one, of course) I imagined a headdress for her in two colour schemes.

Aida Gold

Aida Teal

How fun are they? I am leaning toward the teal, but also love the gold. What you think? Which one should she wear?

The snake symbol

In Egyptian mythology, the snake symbol represented royalty and divinity. It symbolized the pharaoh’s role as lawmaker and maintainer of order, protecting the Egyptian people from the forces of chaos. The snake was also a symbol of protection, both for pharaohs and for everyday people.

The Opera

Set in Ancient Egypt, Aida is a timeless story of love and betrayal set against the backdrop of war. The story is a roller coaster of emotions told through Giuseppe Verdi’s powerful music.

Aida is an Ethiopian princess who is the captured slave to Amneris, daughter of Pharaoh. Both women are in love with the victorious Egyptian general Radames, but he loves only Aida.

The father of Aida, Amonasro, invades Egypt to rescue her, but is defeated and captured. Relentlessly jealous of the lovers, Amneris decides she will kill Aida and disgrace Radames. He is subsequently condemned as a traitor and buried alive in a dungeon tomb.

Aida joins her lover in his death chamber to die with him while Egyptian priests celebrate the country’s victory in the temple above them. A desperate, remorseful Amneris attempts to save Radames but her pleas for mercy are too late.

Thank you for spending time with us! Warm regards, Vivian.

Hattingdon Horses

Cartoon Horses with ‘Hat-titude’

Featured Image: Fashion and Beautify in Ancient Egypt


©Vivian J Grant

Trill

by Hattingdon

I absolutely adores top hats. In this one I am heading out to the Opera, sporting a black topper with a wide white hatband and stunning gold opera glasses.

I have rarely looked more darling . . . . positively “lyrical” wouldn’t you say? Mrs Farrell named the design Trill.

Trill Hattingdon. ©Hattingdon Horses.
Trill.

Come back and see us soon.

Hattingdon Horses®

©Vivian Grant Farrell, creator and designer of Hattingdon Horses.