Yvette in blue

Summer is beginning to wind down, and Hattingdon has yet to wear her “Yvette” butterfly hat. Vivian created this hat with christenings and weddings in mind. The symbolic butterfly is perfect.

Here it is in baby blue. Hattingdon always looks extra sweet in blue.

Yvette Hattingdon Blue.

Butterflies are deep and powerful representations of life. Butterflies are beautiful and have mystery, symbolism, and meaning and are a metaphor representing spiritual rebirth, transformation, change, hope, and life. 

See you back here soon!

Hattingdon Horses

A Hatful of Smiles

by ©Vivian J Grant

Flashback with Yvette

These hats were created for Hattingdon a few years ago for attending spring and summer weddings. They are also very nice for christenings. There is one in blue; and one in pink. The design name is Yvette.

Yvette Hat in Blue.
Yvette Hat in Pink.

Love the use of butterflies in the design, don’t you? Butterflies are quite symbolic. We found this:

“Butterflies are beautiful and have mystery, symbolism, and meaning and are a metaphor representing spiritual rebirth, transformation, change, hope, and life.” writes Gardens with Wings.

Well, that fits perfectly with hats for weddings and christenings, doesn’t it?

We also found these wonderful thoughts about the butterfly at the University of Michigan website but unfortunately the link was alerted as unstable, so we copied the following quickly and got out.

Rounded Open Quote in Gray

“In its metamorphosis from the common, colorless caterpillar to the exquisite winged creature of delicate beauty, the butterfly has become a metaphor for transformation and hope; across cultures, it has become a symbol for rebirth and resurrection, for the triumph of the spirit and the soul over the physical prison, the material world.”

“Among the ancients, is an emblem of the soul and of unconscious attraction towards light. It is the soul as the opposite of the worm. In Western culture, the butterfly represents lightness and fickleness.

“Note Owen Warland’s spiritual progression in Nathaniel Hawthorne’s Artist of the Beautiful as it parallels the development of the butterfly which he struggles to mechanically recreate. In China, secondary meanings of joy and bliss. Is very closely related to love, especially with wings and when being burned in Cupid’s hand that is not holding the bow. Wantonness, especially in Shakespeare. In Yeats, the opposite of the hawk, intuition as opposed to logic.”


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