Bobbie

New Hat Alert!

Vivian created a brand new hat for Hattingdon, inspired by the mod era of the 1960s. Naturally, she created the design in numerous lush colors. She named her newest hat design Bobbie.

Bobbie Turquoise.
Bobbie Lime Green.
Bobbie Vivid Orange.
Bobbie Lipstick Pink.
Bobbie Royal Purple.
Bobbie Sunny Yellow.

Aren’t they wonderful? We love them!

Thank you for visiting with us. See you again soon.

Hattingdon Horses

A “Hatful of Smiles”

Cooking with Bryanna

Back in 2011 Vivian made a chef’s hat for Hattingdon that she named Bryanna — after vegan chef Bryanna Clark Grogan.

Vivian thought she had lost the file, but recently she came across it while looking through an old flash drive. The file was not in good shape — the layers unfortunately were locked — but she said, what the heck, I will recreate it. We are glad she did.

Bryanna with whisk.

We were thinking about putting the Bryanna design on some cool product. The only challenge we can see at the moment is how to fit it on a mug. It may have to be without the whisk, but that’s okay . . . . look.

Bryanna sans Whisk.

We will keep you posted.

In the meantime, learn more about chef Bryanna Clark Grogan at http://veganfeastkitchen.blogspot.com/. She is terrific.

See you again here soon.

Regards,

Hattingdon & Co

A “Hatful of Smiles”

Updated: 06.24.22 4:25 am EST

Donna Classic

Well, here we are . . . . late again. What is it about Mondays? Sigh!

Just the same, here is a treat for you this Classic Hat Monday. It is one of the very earliest classic hats that Vivian created (2008?), and the design is so imaginative. She named it “Donna” — after Donna Karan of course, who uses rickrack in her creations.

Donna Classic Hat.

We love how the black and gray stripes are set off by the multi colored “rickrack”. Speaking of rickrack, check this out.

Rickrack

Wikipedia tells us:

Rounded Open Quote in Gray

Invented in the mid-19th century, [rickrack] took its modern form and current name around 1880.

During the 1890s, American home sewers used imported European rickrack as decorative edgings for dresses, aprons, and lingerie. Rickrack was also stitched into lace elements, which were then used to decorate bedding and other home linens. Between the 1890s and 1910s, rickrack experienced a decrease in popularity. Then, during the 1910s, rickrack experienced a resurgence in popularity, and American manufacturers began producing rickrack to supply to the domestic market.

In rural America in the 1930s, 40s, and 50s, rickrack was used to decorate flour sack dresses. These dresses were worn as everyday attire, and were constructed from the large cotton bags that flour, chicken feed, and other goods were shipped in.

Since the food had to be shipped in fabric bags anyway, the flour mills competed with each other by using attractive, colorful fabrics that the buyer could either resell or upcycle into dresses, aprons, nightgowns, dishtowels, and other clothing and household items. Adding trim like rickrack was a way to reduce the stigma around needing to use whatever fabric was available, rather than buying it from a store.


Thank you for spending time here with us today. We hope you enjoyed it, and Hattingdon gave you a hatful of smiles.

Hattingdon Horses

A “Hatful of Smiles”

Updated 2:29 pm

Cool Breeze

Sweltering weather calls for a cool breeze. And we have just that in the form of a fabulous hat we named Breeze. Here’s Hattingdon modeling it for us.

Breeze Hattingdon summery blue hat.
Breeze Hattingdon.

How about a haiku to go with this gorgeous hat? We found this one by MCW at All Poetry.

breath of solstice breeze
lilac tipped with sun dried grass
cicadas sharp chant

See more by MCW at https://allpoetry.com/MCW »

Love you bunches.

Hattingdon Horses

A “Hatful of Smiles”

Happy Flag Day

In keeping with the Flag Act of 1777, Betsy Ross, an upholsterer from Philadelphia, created the earliest design for the national flag of the United States. It had red and white stripes outermost with thirteen white stars arranged in a circle against a dark blue background in its upper left hand corner.

Flag Day in the United States, now called National Flag Day, is a holiday commemorating the date in 1777 when the United States approved the Betsy Ross design for its first national flag.

Betsy Hattingdon Flag Hat version 1.
Betsy Hattingdon.

Pres. Woodrow Wilson proclaimed June 14 as the official date for Flag Day, and in 1949 the US Congress permanently established the date as National Flag Day. The resolution read: “Resolved, that the flag of the United States be thirteen stripes, alternate red and white; that the union be thirteen stars, white in a blue field representing a new constellation.” Each star represented a state and each stripe represented the 13 colonies that declared independence from Great Britain. The colors of the flag were inherited from British flags and have no official meaning.


We celebrate National Flag Day with our “Betsy” hat inspired by and in homage to Betsy Ross.

Hattingdon Horses

A Hatful of Smiles

©Vivian Grant Farrell, creator and designer of Hattingdon Horses.

Savannah Classic

It is that time of year when it sometimes feels a little like Summer and a little like Spring.

Hattingdon has the perfect classic hat for the coolness of Spring and the promised warmth of Summer. After we enjoy the hat, how about a few lines of beautiful poetry?

Savannah.

Spring

‘Lines Written in Early Spring’ by William Wordsworth

Through primrose tufts, in that green bower,
The periwinkle trailed its wreaths;
And ’tis my faith that every flower
Enjoys the air it breathes.

The birds around me hopped and played,
Their thoughts I cannot measure:—
But the least motion which they made
It seemed a thrill of pleasure…

Source: Classic Spring Poems Everyone Should Read »

Summer

From ‘A Summer’s Night’ by Paul Laurence Dunbar

The night is dewy as a maiden’s mouth,
The skies are bright as are a maiden’s eyes,
Soft as a maiden’s breath the wind that flies
Up from the perfumed bosom of the South.
Like sentinels, the pines stand in the park;
And hither hastening, like rakes that roam,
With lamps to light their wayward footsteps home,
The fireflies come stagg’ring down the dark.


About these marvelous poets.

William Wordsworth

William Wordsworth (1770-1850) was one of the founders of English Romanticism and one its most central figures and important intellects. He is remembered as a poet of spiritual and epistemological* speculation, a poet concerned with the human relationship to nature and a fierce advocate of using the vocabulary and speech patterns of common people in poetry. The son of John and Ann Cookson Wordsworth, William Wordsworth was born on April 7, 1770 in Cockermouth, Cumberland, located in the Lake District of England: an area that would become closely associated with Wordsworth for over two centuries after his death.

*Epistemologists study the nature, origin, and scope of knowledge, epistemic justification, the rationality of belief, and various related issues.

Source: Poetry Foundation »


Paul Laurence Dunbar

Paul Laurence Dunbar (1872-1906) was the son of African parents who had been slaves prior to the American Civil War. Dunbar also wrote novels and plays, as well as penning the lyrics for the 1903 musical comedy, In Dahomey — the first all-African-American musical that was ever produced on Broadway. But it was as a poet — one of the first internationally popular African-American poets — that Dunbar would achieve real fame and success. He died young, of tuberculosis, aged just 33.

Source: Poetry Foundation »


Thank you for stopping by. We hope you enjoyed it. Bye for now.

Hattingdon Horses

A Hatful of Smiles

©Vivian Grant Farrell, creator and designer of Hattingdon Horses.